Request to radio traffic reporters

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As I’m driving around, slightly zoned out (but not so zoned out to be a danger to myself or society), the traffic reports are usually the same, so I don’t pay too much attention.

There are, however, instances where a reporter will give information on a major accident or hazard that is sure to clog up the roads for some time, and the reporter rarely repeats where this incident is located. He or she will just say, “So stay clear of THAT area!” and move on with the rest of the scoop from the (insert sponsor’s name here) traffic center.

All I ask is that they simply wrap it up by saying, “Again, that’s on northbound Watt near Folsom” or wherever the incident is.  I find myself having a DVR reflex, like I’m reaching for a phantom remote to hit the back-up-15-seconds button to hear the location. Alas, there is no such technology in my rig.

Am I just being picky?

About RunnerGirl

The secret to running 50K/50 mile/100K races = Run until it gets too hard, then walk until it gets too easy. Repeat. I can give you some good taping techniques to prevent blisters, too. Likes: brains, wit, athletic prowess, thirst for knowledge, adventurous palate, kindness to animals, generosity of spirit, the Western States trail, Brooks running shoes, Streets of London Pub Quiz, David Sedaris, Arrested Development, Sherman Alexie, Malcolm Gladwell, Eddie Izzard, Gilmore Girls, House, Top Chef, Top Model, '80s mod/techno/industrial, California Golden Bears, Alfred Hitchcock, Will Shortz's puzzles, Armstrong & Getty, running ultra-marathons on the trails Dislikes: Under Armour clothing worn as an everyday fashion choice, real fake-y looking French manicures, snobs, mayonnaise, the words "moist" and "delicious" (or any made-up variation of "delicious," especially "delish" -- thank Rachael Ray for ruining it for everyone), country music, running on pavement

9 Responses to Request to radio traffic reporters

  1. Lou says:

    Agreed.

    Luckily, KWOD’s pretty good about that, I rarely listen to anything else. And my commute to work consists of getting there at 4am and leaving at 1pm, but still… :D

  2. adamant says:

    If you would just take advantage of mass transit you wouldn’t have this problem… But I too suffer from phantom DVR reflex. Maybe the restless leg syndrome people will make us a pill.

  3. CoolDMZ says:

    I don’t think it’s a serious problem until you find yourself pointing a phantom remote at real life and going “badoop badoop badoop”

  4. T Mc says:

    My real complaint about traffic reports is when they just read the incidents off the CHP website in no particular order (ie. there’s an accident on eastbound 50 at Watt, a stall on I-80 at Antelope, a crash on hwy 99, and an accident on eastbound 50 at Bradshaw). I listen for my freeway(s), and when they’re jumbled up like that its very difficult to track.

    I miss Commander Bill.

  5. Turty Squip says:

    I just call 911 on my cell phone, and ask them to tell me about the traffic. Or if you text “traffic” to #1530, they will text you back with the latest update.

  6. Jose says:

    I’m going to borrow “DVR reflex” from this point on as I’ve been using “phantom DVR” to explain the phenomenon of me wanting to rewind the radio not only during traffic reports, but when listening to radio talk shows as well.

    A+++ post, would read again!

  7. runnergirl says:

    Thanks,Jose! Do you find yourself wanting to fast forward through meetings, too? :)

  8. Melly says:

    I suffer from the DVR reflex all the time…most often on Sunday mornings when I listen to Car Talk and Wait Wait!

    I’ve often wanted to rewind during a real-time conversation with someone. :)

  9. RunnerGirl says:

    Melly, you can download podcasts of Wait Wait, Car Talk, Sunday Puzzle, and all of your other NPR favorites on iTunes and other places on the interwebs, too! Just listen to the Sunday Puzzle and Wait Wait in your car or the comfort of your own home, as there’s not much else more disturbing to others than the crazy person shouting out the answers while running down the street or doing squats at the gym.

    There’s a special place in heaven reserved for Will Shortz, Peter Sagal, and Click & Clack.