“Character education is like, the foundation”

The Bee today reports on several area schools that are taking part in local non-profit group Center for Youth Citizenship’s “Free to Learn” program, that helps little students build traits like “caring, giving and service; justice and fairness; leadership, initiative and teamwork; respect; responsibility; and trustworthiness.”

“Character education is, like, the foundation of my classroom,” said Carly Davenport, who teaches fourth grade at Prairie [Elementary, in Elk Grove].

That is like, a really noble goal. (I kid the Carly Davenport. I am a horrible impromptu public speaker.)

In the abstract, I suppose it is good that educators are concerned with building those skills. What sorts of content do they cover to achieve those goals?

Teresa Faruzzi recently gave her second-grade class a peculiar assignment.

The Charles Mack Elementary students had to decide whether an animal’s camouflage was helpful or harmful to others. They scanned science books to pick a critter.

The assignment’s intent was to help students connect a character value — such as respect or fairness — to an animal’s ability to camouflage itself.

Stupid chameleons are like, so cheating. Other topics that were considered include:

  • The Number 4: Villain or Superhero?
  • Would George Washingon prefer Pokemon or Yu-Gi-Oh?
  • Water: Is it friendly?
  • “Plural possessives make mommy cry” — Tommy G’s story
  • Electrons: Why do they have to be like, so negative?

Author: CoolDMZ

"X-ray vision to see in between / Where's my kimono and my time machine?"

6 thoughts on ““Character education is like, the foundation””

  1. This post has been nominated for The Sacramento Bee’s roundup of regional blogs, which appears Sunday in Forum. As part of an unofficial program, you can help decide which blog posts are included by voting at http://www.ipsosacto.com/bw. Voting usually closes Thursday evening.

    The Sunday newspaper column is limited to less than 800 words. Blog posts included in the column are often cut to fit. No editing is done other than to add ellipses to indicate deleted passages. The blog’s main address will appear in The Bee, and the online copy of the article will contain links to the actual blog post.

    A list of the regional blogs monitored can be reviewed at http://www.ipsosacto.com/bloglist.

    If you have questions (or you DON’T want your blog post considered for inclusion in the newspaper column), contact me at ipsosacto.com/contact.

    John Hughes

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  2. Great post DMZ. By 2nd grade children are wrestling with real-life emotional and ethical struggles – why not talk about fairness and respect in the context of friends and siblings, or honesty to parents, or selfishness vs. sharing? And by the way is it really a good idea to encourage students to criticize the morality of a creature that is just naturally designed to camouflage and actually has no other option? That sounds so absurd.

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  3. This post has been nominated for The Sacramento Bee’s roundup of regional blogs, which appears Sunday in Forum. As part of an unofficial program, you can help decide which blog posts are included by voting at http://www.ipsosacto.com/bw. Voting usually closes Thursday evening.

    The Sunday newspaper column is limited to less than 800 words. Blog posts included in the column are often cut to fit. No editing is done other than to add ellipses to indicate deleted passages. The blog’s main address will appear in The Bee, and the online copy of the article will contain links to the actual blog post.

    A list of the regional blogs monitored can be reviewed at http://www.ipsosacto.com/bloglist.

    If you have questions (or you DON’T want your blog post considered for inclusion in the newspaper column), contact me at ipsosacto.com/contact.

    John Hughes

    Like

  4. He must be a fan! Speaking of fans, I hope John Hughes can forward me Molly Ringwald’s phone number. Thanks, and Save Ferris!!

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