Pop-up TARDIS lending library in Tahoe Park

3eaf5b6e9bc49ec3fc8a15d525a7b287.max800Daniel Steinhart, a healthcare administrator from my neighborhood of Tahoe Park, constructed a “Little Free Library” near his home in Tahoe Park. This one is notable for its incredibly geeky shape: a 1960s-era police call box from the UK, now popularly known as the TARDIS, the ship The Doctor (as in “Doctor Who”) uses to travel through spacetime.

A Little Free Library is a pop-up “take a book, return a book” lending library installation that people can use to recycle books and related stuff (toys/games) with their neighbors. The library is bigger on the inside, with everyone in the community sharing what they can. Continue reading “Pop-up TARDIS lending library in Tahoe Park”

Anonymous Do-gooder Does Good Well

Andrew Carnegie knew how to put his name on donations
Andrew Carnegie knew how to put his name on donations

It started as a few disparate people getting gift cards in the mail around Christmas. The cards were sent from an anonymous gift-giver who, from all evidence, seems to favor those people in the Sacramento community who do their thing and in the process make our town a better place.

I noticed several people in my Facebook feed thanking this anonymous Santa, people like Brian Crall, owner of the Sacramento Comedy Spot, or Chris Crotty, owner of ComedySportz, or standup Keith Lowell Jensen. Each of the three received a gift card with a note saying, “Thank you for all you do for the Sacramento comedy community.”

Thinking this was just a nice gesture from an ardent comedy fan, I stored it away as interesting and nice.

But, just in the last few days I’ve seen posts from John Marcotte, political satirist and high-brow prankster, Stephanie Rector, organizer of Sac Geeks, and a few other “non-comedy” souls. These cards were sent with custom notes that basically said thank you for making Sacramento a better place.

So, #1 This gift-giver is awesome and deserves high praise for true heart and brilliant execution. #2 I don’t need to know who it is, nor should you. They’ve chosen to remain anonymous and that’s just fine. #3 Their choice of recipients is interesting and I’d like to know if anyone else out there received such a gift. If you did or know of someone else that did, please comment below or shoot me an email at saceats at gmail dot com.

Sorry Folks, Bandera is Still the Best Burger in Town

I know it’s a chain. I know the drinks are too expensive. I know you can’t go there without getting hit on by some geriatric divorcee or Persian car dealer. I know. I know all of these things. It doesn’t make the burger taste any worse. It is a perfect burger.

Poppyseed bun. House ground, highest quality meat. Cooked to order on the doneness scale. More importantly, cooked correctly, to order, on the doneness scale. Topped with good cheddar, mayo, lettuce, tomato, onion. Served with a side of slaw. It’s everything you want in a burger and nothing you don’t.

Sure, it costs $16 and doesn’t even come with full release, but it’s worth it. This is not an everyday, got nothing in the fridge to cook, can’t decide on pizza or chinese, kind of burger. It’s a special occasion burger. It’s a birthday burger. It’s a breakup burger. It’s a promotion burger. But don’t get me wrong, it’s not better than Bandera’s $20 french dip, but that’s another story.

It is, however,  better than, in no particular order, Nationwide, Scott’s, Dime, Formoli, Squeeze, Jerry’s, Smashburger, Five Guys, and any other place you could name. It’s just that good. It’s definitely better than Nationwide. I don’t know what’s wrong with you people that keep telling me that place is the tits. It’s not. It’s just sad and weird and overpriced for what you get, and unexceptional. It’s like the Zelda’s of burgers. Oooooooooooooooooooooo, yeah I said it.

Bandera- 2232 Fair Oaks Blvd (at Howe), 922.3524,

Nineteenth-century graffitti at Sutter’s Fort uncovered

Fun tidbit in this Bee article today about the facelift at the Central Building at Sutter’s Fort.

Clearing out the historic building has also resulted in some pleasant surprises, [Tim Gellinck, a restoration works specialist]added.

“We always knew that there was historic graffiti from the 1840s up in the attic of the building, but there was so much clutter up there that we couldn’t get to it,” Gellinck said. “Once the clutter was removed and the shingles were taken off, the light exposed quite a bit of graffiti that we didn’t realize was there.”

The crews found one particular inscription reading: “The Industrial Army Camped Here,” that was dated May 4, 1894. The Industrial Army Movement was apparently a roving populist group of unemployed laborers agitating on behalf of workers hurt by the bad economy of the time. #OccupySuttersFort!